Events

Climate exodus: hope, refusals and acts of defiance during uneasy times

University of Newcastle

The UON Environmental Humanities Network invites you to a screening of David Baute’s award winning film Climate Exodus (2020), followed by a seminar that seeks to explore localised responses to climate change and ruin. We live in an uneasy time; a time marked by disasters, tragedy and ruin that challenges our relationships to place and time. Increasingly, a common awareness is emerging of how capitalist progress, growth and development walk hand in hand with experiences of dispossession, displacement and disjuncture. Climate change and environmental destruction are two consequences of the accelerated change that have followed neoliberal globalisation and left the world ‘overheated’ (Eriksen 2016) and unable to sustain life as we know it. The UON Environmental Humanities Network invites you to a seminar that seeks to explore localised responses to climate change and ruin. The seminar will take as its starting point the ethnographic film Climate Exodus by David Baute, which narrates the tragedy of three women who have lost everything due to climate change and emigrate to start a new life. Drawing on the stories of the film, Hedda Askland will discuss how we can understand displacement in the context of climate change and the political implications of framing displacement in […]

Free

A Night with the Outer Sanctum: Inside the Group Chat

Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group

The Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group invites you to get “inside the group chat” of the award-winning podcast The Outer Sanctum and find out how they engage with the big ideas and challenging problems in sport and beyond each week. The Outer Sanctum is best described as AFLM and AFLW chat done differently with an all-women podcast featuring ten passionate footy fans. The team discuss and unpack Aussie Rules and other sports stories from the outer with a consciously feminist and inclusive lens. The team consists of: Emma Race Shelley Ware Rana Hussain Lucy Race Alicia Sometimes Nicole Hayes Tess Armstrong Kate Seear Julia Chiera Felicity Race The Outer Sanctum is a place for football stories and passionate footy voices we don't usually get to hear, and it is this focus on inclusion and intersectionality that will frame the conversation for this live event. The Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group – led by Dr Kasey Symons – will provide insight on how podcasts such as The Outer Sanctum are changing the way we hear about, discuss and consume sport media. Kasey’s research has found that alternative and independent sports media platforms create custom content that reflects a diversity of voices and representation of athletes, sports and issues […]

Free

Social science is everywhere: An introduction for Australian secondary students

Virtual

Academy of Social Sciences in Australia

The social sciences impact how we live our daily lives, as well as how our society functions. Join this webinar live or on-demand to gain an understanding of how the social sciences help us to study, analyse and solve society’s most compelling challenges. Please register to receive a copy of the webinar recording after the event. Designed specifically for Australian secondary students in years 9-12, the webinar is hosted by the President of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, Professor Richard Holden. Richard is Professor of Economics at the UNSW Business School and his research and opinion pieces have been featured in The New York Times, the Australian Financial Review, The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald and more. Event date and time: 9.45am-10.15am (AEDT), Tuesday 6 September 2022 Register Now

Free

Help the helper: Adventure Therapy for Burnout Syndrome

Virtual

Charles Sturt University

This workshop examines a triangulation study on how adventure therapy can be used for helping professionals experiencing burnout. Unda Avota from Adventure Therapy Latvia created a 3-day test program, then refined it slightly and applied it to two study groups, using the Professional Quality of Life Scale in pre, post, follow-up tests. Qualitative data were collected 2 weeks after the intervention in individual interviews and 3 months later in focus group interviews. This workshop will examine the findings of our adventure therapy can be used to reduce burnout and improve mind-body connections. The results surpassed expectations, even in spite of the COVID-19 outbreak, even after 3 months, several participants admitted that they felt the positive impact and actively applied the learned skills for stress management. Presenters: Unda Avota, Adventure Therapy Latvia Will Dobud, Charles Sturt University

Free

A New Education World: A TASA & AARE Sociology of Education Symposium

The Australian Sociological Association

Education has been profoundly disrupted and transformed in the last two years because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that educational institutions are grappling with possible futures, and in the context of a new Australian government, this event explores how sociological approaches can inform our thinking about education futures. The Sociology of Education groups at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) and the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) are joining forces to organise a public event on the value of sociology to thinking about the future of education as part of Social Science Week 2022. Join us in person or online for a rich and thought-provoking symposium featuring leading Australian sociologists of education and emerging researchers in the field, featuring a keynote presentation on the future of universities by Prof. Jane Kenway (Monash University). The event is organised with the generous support of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) and the Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne (MGSE). Register now

What comes next? | Humanities

UNSW Sydney

The 21st century has been plagued with one crisis after another – a global pandemic, climate catastrophes, economic turmoil and senseless violence. So how do we equip ourselves for what’s around the corner? To forge our path through this uncertainty, hear from five UNSW Sydney thinkers who are discovering the future of video gaming, the wild west of cryptocurrencies, the dark side of hybrid education and how we could use algorithms to build the cities of the future. Making living cities | John Carr We’ve made momentous advances in technology, transport and architecture, but our blueprint for a city has not changed since the Second World War. So what could our urban hubs of the future look like? Are computer-generated cities in the future | Claire Daniel We trust algorithms to do everything from online shopping to telling us what to eat for dinner, is it time we let them help us build the cities of the future? The future of social gaming | Nathan J Jackson This year, Twitch streamers have watched 6.13 billion hours of video game content… so where is this massive industry heading? And what does the future of gaming look like? The dark forest of cryptocurrency | Tony […]

Free

Ngukurr to Newcastle: exploring the living archive through possum skin cloak making

University of Newcastle

Join us for a conversation which explores the life of Dexter Daniels a Union activist from the community of Ngukurr in the Northern Territory. Dexter was key in organising and supporting the Wave Hill walk-off and other strikes for worker’s rights and land across the Northern Territory. Recent research has uncovered Dexter’s connections to Newcastle, through his engagement with the Trades Unions. We are working with the Ngukurr community and students from Cooks Hill campus to re-tell his story through the medium of a possum skin coat. Keri Clarke will explain the process of possum skin cloak making and students will talk about their experiences of being involved. With Keri Clarke, BoonWurrug Wemba Wemba Cloak Maker, Kate Senior, Professor of Anthropology, University of Newcastle, and students from the Cooks Hill Campus of Newcastle High Register now

Free

Impacting society for good: How the church can partner with community

Charles Sturt University

How can the church partner with other grassroots community organisations to make a lasting difference in 2022? Anglicare Australia, over the last two years, has released a series of reports outlining how Australians are struggling to meet their most basic needs. People are reporting to Anglicare workers that they are feeling stressed, isolated and a sense of hopelessness. They are sharing concerns about their lack of connections with others, unmet spiritual needs, deteriorating mental health, lack of stable accommodation and the increased cost of living. How can the church partner with other grassroots community organisations to make a lasting difference in 2022? What role do faith, hope, love, kindness, joy and connection have when working in partnership? These questions will be addressed by the presenters: Dr Monica Short - Senior lecturer in the School of Social Work and Arts at Charles Sturt University, Gulbali, and the Australian Centre for Christianity and Culture Bishop Mark Short - Anglican Diocese of Canberra and Goulburn Professor Anthony Maher – Director of the Australian Centre for Christianity and Culture The Reverend Sarah Plummer – Executive Manager Mission and Culture Anglicare, Anglicare Jeremy Halcrow - Anglicare CEO Ben Paton - Director of Synergy Youth This event is both in-person (Australian Centre […]

Free

Engaging with Aboriginal history: Learning from museum collections, art and teaching on country

Deakin University

Abstract At a time of important conversations in Australia about recognition, respect and reform, this forum discussion will explore approaches to engaging with Aboriginal history through art, museum collections, and teaching and learning on country. The panel discussion represents a valuable opportunity to learn about ways to engage with Aboriginal history through conversation with four of Australia’s leading indigenous academics and educators. Details This event will take place at Deakin Downtown (727 Collins Street, Docklands) and via Zoom. Speakers Professor Julie Andrews Julie Andrews is descended from the Woiwurrung people of Melbourne and the Yorta Yorta tribe near the borders of Victoria and New South Wales along the Murray River. She is a member of the Dhulanyagan family clan of the Ulupna people. Julie has been teaching Aboriginal Studies for approximately 10 years and has extensive experience in policy and Indigenous higher education. She teaches the first year Discovery subject HUS1ABS: Introduction to Aboriginal Australia. This subject is taught across all of La Trobe University campuses. It is a blended subject of online lectures and face to face workshops. The subject is basically a very broad introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues. It is useful for those wanting to […]

Free

Narratives for violence and their persistence over time

Virtual

Academy of Social Sciences in Australia

Collective violence against marginalised groups is a tragic phenomenon in many societies. Often such acts are accompanied by specific narratives that justify the necessity for systematic persecution. How do these narratives become prevalent and why do they persist? In this talk, Dr. Walker addresses these questions first through a broad discussion of what narratives are and how they can be used to justify violence. She then examines these concepts through the lens of history, focusing on the persistence of anti-Black narratives in the United States, and highlighting the implications for other societies, such as Australia, currently reconciling their pasts. Dr Sarah Walker is a recipient of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia's prestigious Paul Bourke Award for Early Career Research. The Paul Bourke Lectures are named in honour of the late Paul Francis Bourke (1938–1999), President of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia from 1993–1997. These lectures are presented each year by the recipients of the previous year’s Paul Bourke Awards for Early Career Research. This lecture is jointly hosted by the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and UNSW for Social Sciences Week. Register now

Free

What are the economic implications of a changing climate?

Virtual

Academy of Social Sciences in Australia

Given the warnings from scientists of potentially catastrophic changes to our climate from greenhouse gas emissions, it might surprise you to learn that we know very little about the potential economic implications of these unprecedented changes to the Earth’s climate. This lecture, directed at a general audience, will explore the potential channels through which climate change will impact our economy, and the unrealistic assumptions that underlie current models used to predict the economic impact of a changing climate. Insights from current research will be presented, as well as directions of future research into this extremely important subject. Dr Timothy Neal is a recipient of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia's prestigious Paul Bourke Award for Early Career Research. The Paul Bourke Lectures are named in honour of the late Paul Francis Bourke (1938–1999), President of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia from 1993–1997. These lectures are presented each year by the recipients of the previous year’s Paul Bourke Awards for Early Career Research. This lecture is jointly hosted by the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and UNSW for Social Sciences Week. Register now

Free

Two to tango: Language as a gateway to championing diversity

University of Western Australia

Harvard-trained lawyer Vernā Myers has famously stated that “if diversity is getting invited to the party, inclusion is being asked to dance”. What role does language play in getting invited to the dance floor? Join Dr Celeste Rodriguez Louro, Director of UWA’s Language Lab, to discuss how language, the ultimate social glue, can help you become a diversity champion. Learn about new gender pronouns in English, cross-cultural differences in communication, and how your accent may be stopping you from getting what you want. We can create safer places by understanding how language shapes our lives. But it does take two to tango.

Free