Events

Harmful care, careful harm: relational entanglements in migration

Virtual , Australia

University of Sydney

This timely event will bring together experts from the diverse corners of the field of migration studies to consider the complex and dynamic relationship between care and harm in international migration. Scholars of migration have documented the multivarious forms of harm that arise from the systems, institutions and interactions surrounding the movements of people across borders. Researchers have also explored the many forms of local and transnational care that are created by, or persist despite, international migration. In this event, we explore the ways care and harm are interwoven, interdependent and mutually constitutive in diverse migration contexts. Relationships of care (for example, between migrants or between migrants and ‘allies’ in civil society) may arise in response or resistance to the harms imposed by exploitative policies and practices. Equally, policies and practices that appear to be ‘caring’ may reproduce, obscure or naturalise harm, at times perpetuating the very inequalities and injustices they purport to address. Grounded in diverse settings including immigration detention, aged care, temporary labour migration schemes, the family home, and media platforms, the speakers will present brief talks drawing on their specialist research. The speakers will then come together for a panel discussion of harmful care, careful harm, and the imperative to pursue more meaningful forms of care […]

Free

Innovative methods for exploring financial abuse

Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn Campus ATC Lecture Theatre, 427-451 Burwood Rd, Hawthorn, Victoria

Swinburne University of Technology

Symposium series: ‘Understanding and intervening in financial abuse’ Financial abuse is an insidious, yet common, form of gendered violence. The 2024 – 2026 ARC Discovery Project ‘Prioritising women’s financial safety: Developing institutional interventions for intimate partner financial abuse’ aims to develop a framework for understanding post-separation financial violence. The Discovery Project includes funding for a four-part symposium series. The aim of the series is to bring together academics in law, criminology, sociology, economics with public policy and experts with experience of financial abuse to build a community of practice that, together, can seed collaborations and bring a wider suite of problems and reform proposals to the attention of policymakers. Expressions of interest The focus of this first symposium is to explore innovative and interdisciplinary methods for exploring financial abuse. The symposium will feature interactive panels, short academic papers, a collaborative mapping activity and time for informal discussions. To express interest in either: (1) presenting a paper, (2) contributing to a panel, or (3) participating as a delegate, and applying for a bursary if eligible, please complete this form. Please note that timeslots within the 6-hour symposium are extremely limited, so not all papers will be able to be accommodated. If […]

Free

Doctors with a difference? Social science insights on widening participation in medicine: Australian, Canadian and UK perspectives

Virtual , Australia

University of Newcastle

Medical schools have historically been prestigious and exclusive institutions, filled with students who come from much wealthier families than average. Elaborate and competitive selection processes and the costs involved in applying to medicine are barriers to students from low-income backgrounds, as well as the perception that medicine is out of reach. For over two decades, widening participation initiatives have focused on encouraging underrepresented groups to apply to medical school, including low-income and ‘first-in-family’ students whose parents are not university-educated, based on the assumption that a more diverse medical profession will lead to better care and health outcomes for patients. The success of these initiatives has largely been measured by statistics showing increased application and admission rates of low-income/first-in-family students. Much less attention has been paid to the experience of these students once they enter medical school, and even less is known about their experiences, aspirations and trajectories as doctors. Are there residual forms of inequity that persist within medical schools, and beyond? How do low-income/first-in-family students see themselves relating to the medical profession and to patients? This webinar presents findings from three countries on the experiences of medical students and doctors who are the first in their family to attend […]

New Technologies in Contemporary Society: Promise, Peril, or Something in Between?

Virtual , Australia

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney

This seminar is hosted by the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, Discipline of Sociology & Criminology and Social Sciences Week 2024. Science and technology are embedded in almost every aspect of our daily lives. Yet too often, they are regarded as value-neutral, apolitical, and beyond democratic debate. As issues around technological sustainability, developments in generative AI, and concerns over humanity’s relationship with the environment become ubiquitous, the need to address the political and ethical dimensions of science and technology is more critical than ever before. Join us for an online lunchtime seminar with a panel of national and international early career scholars as part Social Sciences Week hosted by The University of Sydney. Our panellists will explore the often-unseen social dimensions of science and technology. From the politics of epigenetics and its connection to intergenerational trauma, to the role that generative AI might play in our visions of the future, to the ways in which technologies such as ‘waste drones’ are assisting in large-scale environmental remediation, our speakers will discuss the entanglement of contemporary life with the technological across micro and macro scales. What does it mean to live in and be governed by a technologically driven society? Whose knowledges […]

Free

Celebrating 30 Years of: The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

The Capitol 113 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Victoria

RMIT

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Stephen Elliott’s 1994 masterpiece, ‘The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.’ To celebrate, join us for a spectacular screening at RMIT's fabulously fitting venue, The Capitol. The event will feature an introductory panel discussion with: Tim Chappel - The film's Oscar-winning costume designer Rebel Penfold-Russell - Executive producer Cerise Howard - Melbourne Queer Film Festival Program Director and esteemed film aficionado Kristy Kokegei - History Trust of South Australia Stephen Gaunson - RMIT University Since its initial screening 30 years ago, this multi award-winning film has had a significant impact on society and become internationally renowned as a symbol of freedom and support for the LGBTQIA+ community. Written and directed by Elliott, ‘Priscilla’ follows the road-tripping adventures of two drag queens and a transgender woman, played by Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce, and Terence Stamp, as the trio cross the Australian desert from Sydney to Alice Springs. Presented in partnership with RMIT’s Social Change Enabling Impact Platform and RMIT Culture, as part of the Academy of the Social Sciences of Australia’s Social Sciences Week. Language: English Country: AUS Year: 1994 Duration: 1hr 44m Format: DCP Image credit: Still, ‘The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen […]

$10 – $15

How did humans live before modern societies?

Virtual , Australia

Deakin University

This session, as part of Social Sciences Week 2024, will illuminate key aspects of modern societies and compare them with pre-modern perspectives and worldviews. In this session we will discuss how modern societies were formed and their key aspects before then exploring what our ancestors can teach us about how they lived through topics such as primordial freedoms, egalitarianism, ritual, ceremony, orality and more. Professor Yin Paradies is an Aboriginal animist anarchist activist who is Chair in Race Relations at Deakin University where he conducts research on topics such as racism, anti-racism, cultural competence, Indigenous knowledges and decolonisation. Yin has authored over 250 publications (cited over 20,000 times), been awarded grants worth $49 million and is an invited reviewer for more than 125 journals. Please RSVP to adi-events@deakin.edu.au, you will then receive the Zoom password.

Free

UTS Translational Criminology Seminar Series

UTS UTS City Campus, Building 10 Level 03, Room 470, 235-253 Jones St., Ultimo, NSW, Australia

UTS Criminology

Not just 'Herding Cats'- Vietnamese cannabis gangs and law enforcement Join UTS Criminology and the Crime and Security Science Research Group for our third seminar of 2024 Vietnamese-born prisoners have been considered at the highest rates among most serious offences/charges excluding Australia and New Zealand, almost drug-related offences, higher than the UK-born and Chinese-born. Appearances of Vietnamese-ethnicity groups involved, either directly or indirectly, in cultivating, manufacturing, and trading cannabis. The illegal employment of Vietnamese 'crop-sitters' in Australia, who are employed to stay in the grow house to take care of cannabis plants, is ongoing. Based on previous empirical studies, Luong (2014, 2017, 2019, 2020) tested and clarified family ties and fellow-countrymen associations as the most prioritised forms of those Vietnamese drug trafficking networks. Currently, many authorities are considering those Vietnamese groups in Australia to set up three levels – head (whom they organise and manage the whole process), facilitator (whom they provide spiritual or material assistance in cultivation), and crop-sitter (whom they look after cannabis plants). In contrast, the Herding Cats (dân chăn mèo in Vietnamese) – a memoir of former Vietnamese cannabis insiders, described the most insightful details of why and how dân chăn mèo arrange and design inclusive […]

Free

SSSWARM Seminar Series | Ethnography in the archive: listening, being, and doing in archival collections

Room 203, RD Watt Building, Science Road, University of Sydney, Camperdown Science Road, Camperdown Campus, Sydney, NSW, Australia

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney

Hosted by Sydney Staff & Student Workshops on Anthropology, Research, and Methods (SSSWARM) and the School of Social and Political Sciences. Speaker: Henrietta Byrne (University of Sydney) This presentation utilises reflections from Henrietta's 2021 doctoral fieldwork to explore how anthropologists can bring ethnographic attention to archival materials. As part of her study on the legacies of nuclear testing on Anangu lands and peoples, she spent time in the National Archives of Australia (NAA) and Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) archives, examining documents from the 1984 Royal Commission into British Nuclear Testing. She considers how archives can be rich sites for ethnography and how anthropologists can engage with colonial archival collections without upholding their epistemic power. Contact Michael Edwards with any questions about the SSSWARM Seminar Series: michael.edwards@sydney.edu.au For more info on SSSWARM: https://sophiechao.wixsite.com/ssswarm

Free

17th Annual Wheelwright Lecture: Dollar Hegemony as Law-Making Power, or How the Dollar Shapes the Rules of Global Capitalism

University of Sydney, Camperdown Campus, Building and Room to be advised

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney

Speaker: Ntina Tzouvala, Australian National University Lawyers are latecomers in discussions about dollar hegemony and its effects on international relations and order. The overt weaponisation of the US Dollar in the past 10-15 years has made this reality impossible to ignore, but has largely directed legal debates toward the urgent, but limited, question of sanctions. In addition, discussions about dollar hegemony and the law often focus on the crucial, but unnecessarily narrow, issue of monetary sovereignty. Taking these two issues seriously, this lecture will suggest that they are only part of a broader range of powers and privileges afforded to the United States by dollar hegemony. Deploying a materialist understanding of international law-making, I will suggest that dollar hegemony operates as law-making power in ways antithetical to notions of equal sovereignty that emerged after decolonisation. In so arguing, I also aim to open a dialogue both with heterodox political economists and with law and political economy (LPE) scholars about the precise relationship between international law and the political economy of global capitalism. Ntina Tzouvala is Associate Professor at the ANU College of Law. Her work focuses on the political economy, history and theory of international law. She is the author of Capitalism […]

Free

Corporations, Markets and Climate Change: Opposition or Opportunities?

Room 650, Social Sciences Building, University of Sydney Science Road, Camperdown, NSW, Australia

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney

Corporations and capitalism are often blamed for environmental problems, and on climate change we are often told that there needs to be a ‘balance’ between economic and environmental outcomes.  This suggests they are mutually contradictory, and therefore that the environmental damage resulting from economic imperatives must somehow be accommodated.  On the other hand, there is enormous potential for business to drive the solutions necessary for decarbonising our economy given the economic motivators to do so through markets.  One reason why this is not stressed as much as it could be is that those benefitting from the status quo are in a position to politically frustrate the changes necessary, while for often ideological reasons others believe that the government must take the lead.  The presenters on this panel tease out the opposition and opportunities involved in such debates. Speakers: John Mikler (Chair) and Imogen Ryan: Gaslighting Australia: The Instrumental Power of Australia’s Mining and Energy Industries John Mikler is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. He researches corporations' relations with states, civil society and international organisations, as well as how they are political actors in their own right. He has published […]

Free