Events

Culture as Infrastructure – A CHASS Seminar

Virtual

Council for the Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences

Justin O’Connor, Professor of Cultural Economy, University of South Australia Dan Hill, Director, Melbourne School of Design Tully Barnett, Director, Assemblage Centre for Creative Arts, Flinders University Over the last two decades the dominant paradigm for art and culture has been the ‘creative economy’ and its urban counterpart the ‘creative city’. These have prioritised ‘jobs and growth’ and ‘urban regeneration’ (parsed as rental yields, visitor numbers, inward investment etc.) and have been accompanied by growing precarity, inequality, indebtedness and ‘gentrification’. Whilst other fields of social science have sought to reframe social and economic policy around providing for the social foundations in the context of sustainability and social justice, and urban geographers and designers have sought to re-embed urban policy in the everyday lives and needs of its citizens, (urban) cultural policy has remained resolutely in a neoliberal mindset. As a result, it has been left behind. At the recent 2021 ‘State of Australian Cities’ conference there were over 500 papers, panels and keynotes. Only two mentioned the word ‘culture’. Kate Raworth’s ‘Doughnut’ concept attempts to frame the ‘social foundations’ within planetary limits, giving rise to a number of applied ‘city doughnuts’ including Amsterdam, Brisbane and Melbourne. Only the last includes […]

Free

Climate exodus: hope, refusals and acts of defiance during uneasy times

University of Newcastle

The UON Environmental Humanities Network invites you to a screening of David Baute’s award winning film Climate Exodus (2020), followed by a seminar that seeks to explore localised responses to climate change and ruin. We live in an uneasy time; a time marked by disasters, tragedy and ruin that challenges our relationships to place and time. Increasingly, a common awareness is emerging of how capitalist progress, growth and development walk hand in hand with experiences of dispossession, displacement and disjuncture. Climate change and environmental destruction are two consequences of the accelerated change that have followed neoliberal globalisation and left the world ‘overheated’ (Eriksen 2016) and unable to sustain life as we know it. The UON Environmental Humanities Network invites you to a seminar that seeks to explore localised responses to climate change and ruin. The seminar will take as its starting point the ethnographic film Climate Exodus by David Baute, which narrates the tragedy of three women who have lost everything due to climate change and emigrate to start a new life. Drawing on the stories of the film, Hedda Askland will discuss how we can understand displacement in the context of climate change and the political implications of framing displacement in […]

Free

A Night with the Outer Sanctum: Inside the Group Chat

Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group

The Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group invites you to get “inside the group chat” of the award-winning podcast The Outer Sanctum and find out how they engage with the big ideas and challenging problems in sport and beyond each week. The Outer Sanctum is best described as AFLM and AFLW chat done differently with an all-women podcast featuring ten passionate footy fans. The team discuss and unpack Aussie Rules and other sports stories from the outer with a consciously feminist and inclusive lens. The team consists of: Emma Race Shelley Ware Rana Hussain Lucy Race Alicia Sometimes Nicole Hayes Tess Armstrong Kate Seear Julia Chiera Felicity Race The Outer Sanctum is a place for football stories and passionate footy voices we don't usually get to hear, and it is this focus on inclusion and intersectionality that will frame the conversation for this live event. The Swinburne Sport Innovation Research Group – led by Dr Kasey Symons – will provide insight on how podcasts such as The Outer Sanctum are changing the way we hear about, discuss and consume sport media. Kasey’s research has found that alternative and independent sports media platforms create custom content that reflects a diversity of voices and representation of athletes, sports and issues […]

Free

A New Education World: A TASA & AARE Sociology of Education Symposium

The Australian Sociological Association

Education has been profoundly disrupted and transformed in the last two years because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that educational institutions are grappling with possible futures, and in the context of a new Australian government, this event explores how sociological approaches can inform our thinking about education futures. The Sociology of Education groups at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) and the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) are joining forces to organise a public event on the value of sociology to thinking about the future of education as part of Social Science Week 2022. Join us in person or online for a rich and thought-provoking symposium featuring leading Australian sociologists of education and emerging researchers in the field, featuring a keynote presentation on the future of universities by Prof. Jane Kenway (Monash University). The event is organised with the generous support of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) and the Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne (MGSE). Register now

Exploring tropes of art at the Muloobinba / Newcastle Lockup

University of Newcastle

How do past to contemporary tropes of art add to making and shaping contemporary experiences, understandings and perceptions, not only in the art world but beyond as well? And what are the ways in which different experiences and perceptions of time play a key role for developing useful, critical and potentially additional strategies for the future? Each of the participants in this panel, facilitated at the Newcastle Lock-Up — current and former gallery directors, artists and art lovers — will bring their professional and personal expertise to the conversation. Members of the audience will also be invited to participate in the conversation on the day. The panel conversation is set up in collaboration and co-sponsorship between the Newcastle Lock-Up and the School of Humanities, Creative Industries and Social Sciences (HCISS), University of Newcastle. The panel participants are: Courtney Novak Virginia Cuppaidge Gael Davies Brett McMahon Ron Ramsay Daniela Heil About the Panelists: Courtney Novak, Artistic Director: Courtney Novak has extensive experience in creative programming, exhibition development and project management and arts marketing. Courtney joined The Lock-Up in 2014 and has been instrumental in the organisation’s strategic direction, enabling the contemporary art space to become a nationally recognised, award-winning institution. She […]

Free

What comes next? | Humanities

UNSW Sydney

The 21st century has been plagued with one crisis after another – a global pandemic, climate catastrophes, economic turmoil and senseless violence. So how do we equip ourselves for what’s around the corner? To forge our path through this uncertainty, hear from five UNSW Sydney thinkers who are discovering the future of video gaming, the wild west of cryptocurrencies, the dark side of hybrid education and how we could use algorithms to build the cities of the future. Making living cities | John Carr We’ve made momentous advances in technology, transport and architecture, but our blueprint for a city has not changed since the Second World War. So what could our urban hubs of the future look like? Are computer-generated cities in the future | Claire Daniel We trust algorithms to do everything from online shopping to telling us what to eat for dinner, is it time we let them help us build the cities of the future? The future of social gaming | Nathan J Jackson This year, Twitch streamers have watched 6.13 billion hours of video game content… so where is this massive industry heading? And what does the future of gaming look like? The dark forest of cryptocurrency | Tony […]

Free

Ngukurr to Newcastle: exploring the living archive through possum skin cloak making

University of Newcastle

Join us for a conversation which explores the life of Dexter Daniels a Union activist from the community of Ngukurr in the Northern Territory. Dexter was key in organising and supporting the Wave Hill walk-off and other strikes for worker’s rights and land across the Northern Territory. Recent research has uncovered Dexter’s connections to Newcastle, through his engagement with the Trades Unions. We are working with the Ngukurr community and students from Cooks Hill campus to re-tell his story through the medium of a possum skin coat. Keri Clarke will explain the process of possum skin cloak making and students will talk about their experiences of being involved. With Keri Clarke, BoonWurrug Wemba Wemba Cloak Maker, Kate Senior, Professor of Anthropology, University of Newcastle, and students from the Cooks Hill Campus of Newcastle High Register now

Free

Tackling Tasmania’s big challenges: Social Sciences at the Parliament of Tasmania

University of Tasmania

On Wednesday 7 September 2022, researchers from the University of Tasmania, in partnership with Social Sciences Week, meet with Members of the Tasmanian Parliament in a closed session to discuss tackling Tasmania’s big challenges including: Professor Victoria Carrington and Professor Karen Martin : Trauma informed practice in Tasmanian schools – what does this mean? Professor Nicholas Farrelly: How does our engagement with Asia change under a new Federal Government Associate Professor Catherine Robinson: Homelessness and the bigger housing picture Following the session, each talk will be made into a series of podcasts that address Tasmania’s key challenges politically, economically and culturally, consider where we want to be in 10 years, and focus on the biggest areas of influence now.

Hear her roar: Women’s safety and gender equality in the 2022 Victorian Election

Virtual

Monash University

'Hear me now': 2021 Australian of the Year Grace Tame's acceptance speech was a rally cry that reverberated across the nation. Thousands of women marched for safety in their homes, schools, workplaces and public spaces. The recent federal election clearly demonstrated that what matters to women voters should not be ignored. This panel will unpack the pressing election issues in Victoria for women’s safety and gender equality in the wake of COVID-19.

Free

Vulnerable Bodies and the Un/Making of Wellbeing

Virtual

University of Sydney

Vulnerability is typically imagined as a property of individuals, groups or locales. But vulnerability is not something that is inherent to bodies – physical, social or geographic. Rather, it is produced through a wide variety of social processes that make some bodies more or less vulnerable than others. Vulnerability is patterned in ways that are historically and socially specific, produced at the nexus of markets, economics, politics and cultures, and constantly (re-)made through decisions, discourses and daily practices. Viewed in this way, vulnerability might be individually embodied, but it is also deeply relational and unavoidably socially-structured. This panel will bring together leading social scientists working across a wide range of empirical contexts to discuss how vulnerability is produced in ways that compromise the wellbeing of some over others and further entrench forms of suffering and injustice. Tracing vulnerability as it is produced at the fault-lines of contemporary policy, economic organisation, and governance across scales from the microscopic to the planetary, it will explore how vulnerable bodies are made, and might be unmade, in service of healthier and fairer societies now and into the future. Dr Katherine Kenny, Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, The University of Sydney Prof Alex Broom – […]

Free

The future of technology: Harnessing technology for good?

Monash University

This event will explore the future of technology-facilitated abuse and the challenges, ethics and potentials of using technology to respond, prevent and detect harmful behaviours. It brings together representatives from major social media platforms, international dating apps and the Australian eSafety Commission to shine light on what advances digital companies, and the government, are taking to address technology-facilitated abuse. It will also provide an opportunity for open dialogue between panel members and members of the public, to discuss issues and themes around digital technology, harms, digital crime, AI and social media.

Free

A conversation between research and practice – equity in higher education

Virtual

University of Newcastle

In this online panel, we explore ways that insights from social science research contribute to meaningful community engagement to support new approaches to equity and social justice in higher education. Australian higher education equity policy has continued to struggle to meet its objectives in creating access to higher education for under-represented people and communities. To understand why these disparities persist, The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education (CEEHE) at the University of Newcastle works collaboratively with participants, communities and external agencies to understand who is missing from higher education, why, and what can change to make universities more accessible and relevant. We do this through research-informed practice and practice-informed research - where researchers and practitioners work closely together - to understand social and cultural inequities and injustices that significantly affect educational access, experiences and participation. In this workshop, we bring together speakers across CEEHE programs that work with people from an Out Of Home Background, people with a refugee background and people who are experiencing or have experienced gender-based violence. Register now

Free